Nathan Eisentraut

Piano Teacher • Music Mentor • Collaborative Artist


780.999.9691 • nathan.eisentraut@gmail.com

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Piano Lesson Information

Piano Lesson Basics

What are piano lessons?

In Canada, piano lessons are one-on-one learning sessions between a piano student and a piano teacher that happen periodically over time.

What are piano lessons for?

Piano lessons are intended to provide time for the piano teacher to help the piano student learn to play the piano.

Who can take piano lessons?

Anyone can take piano lessons provided they (or their parents) can convince a piano teacher to take them on as a piano student.

Who can give piano lessons?

While an unregulated profession, people who hold degrees and/or certificates from recognized institutions in pertinent fields (music, education, psychology, critical thinking, etc), and/or have practical teaching experience probably have the most to offer as piano teachers, especially if they are continuing to hone and round out their skills.

Where are piano lessons available?

Piano teachers (along with other music teachers) give lessons mainly at music conservatories, commercial studios, and/or their private home studios in your community.

There are also some private teachers willing to travel to your home, and yet others now offering piano lessons online.

How can I find a piano teacher?

To find a piano teacher, various regional music teacher organizations have listings online, including, for Edmonton:

  • The Alberta Registered Music Teachers’ Association
  • The Alberta Piano Teachers’ Association
  • The Royal Conservatory of Music
  • Conservatory Canada
  • The Suzuki Association of the Americas

Look also for advertisements online, or on community boards, and in community news letters, and ask around – you may already know someone taking lessons.

Conservatories and commercial studios, as well as some private teachers are also on google maps.

When are piano lessons available throughout the year?

While piano lessons can be offered year round, most teachers take a break at least at Christmas, and often during the summer, though the availability of a particular teacher depends on their specific schedule.

When can I start piano lessons?

Often piano teachers start their year in September to coincide with the beginning of the school year, though summer could be a more flexible time to first try out lessons.

But really, if the teacher has availability for you, you can start any agreed-upon time.

How long does a piano lesson take?

Piano lessons are often 30 minutes, 45 minutes or 60 minutes in length, but can be shorter or longer depending on the needs of the student, or how the teacher’s schedule plan works.

How often do piano lessons happen once I have started?

The frequency of piano lessons is typically weekly, but can be twice a week, once every two weeks, or any other custom schedule you can work out with your teacher.

What time during the day can piano lessons happen?

Piano lessons can happen any time during the day, provided the student and teacher can line up their schedules.

After-school times (about 4pm to 7pm) tend to be the most popular for students, though mornings, daytimes, evenings, and weekends may also be possibilities.

Is there anything I need before signing up for piano lessons?

While each piano teacher will have their specifics about which books and materials you may need to get and bring to the lessons, piano students will definitely need access to a piano they can use away from the lesson.

Are there group piano lessons?

Some teachers offer group music/piano lessons as an alternate route for some beginners before they branch off in their own personal way.

Also, sometimes piano teachers have a group lesson component to supplement their one-on-one teaching.

What other kinds of music lessons are there?

There are private music lessons for every instrument that takes time to learn. Other instrument-specific lessons include violin, viola, cello, voice, guitar, drums, flute, recorder and trumpet.

There are also both one-on-one and group theory lessons, as well as composition lessons, often as a supplement to practical lessons at the higher levels.

Learning to Play the Piano

Coming Soon.

How Piano Teachers Can (and Can't) Help

Coming Soon.